Weather


 

About the Solar X-ray status monitor

 

The X-ray Solar status monitor downloads  data periodically from the NOAA Space Environment Center FTP server. The previous 24 hours of 5 minute Long-wavelength X-ray data from each satellite  (GOES 8 and GOES 10) is  analyzed, and an appropriate level of activity for the past 24 hours is assigned as follows:

 

Status
Normal: Solar X-ray flux is quiet (< 1.00e-6 W/m^2)

 

Status
Active: Solar X-ray flux is active (>= 1.00e-6 W/m^2)

 

Status
M Class Flare: An M Class flare has occurred (X-ray flux >= 1.00e-5 W/m^2)

 

Status
X Class Flare: An X Class flare has occurred (X-ray flux >= 1.00e-4 W/m^2)

 

Status
Mega Flare: An unprecedented X-ray event  has occurred (X-ray flux >= 1.00e-3 W/m^2) The designation “Mega Flare” was chosen by Kevin Loch when the status monitor was created on March 4, 1999. There is no “official” designation for flares in this range.

 


 

About the Geomagnetic Field status monitor

 

The Geomagnetic Field status monitor downloads data periodically from the NOAA Space Environment Center FTP server. The previous 24 hours of 3 hour Planetary Kp Index  data is analyzed and an appropriate level of activity for the past 24 hours is assigned as follows:

 

Status
Quiet: the Geomagnetic Field is quiet (Kp < 4)

 

Status
Active: the Geomagnetic Field has been unsettled (Kp=4)

 

Status
Storm: A Geomagnetic Storm has occurred (Kp>4)

 

time_zone_map_300
 UTC or Universal Time Conversion
The Earth has 24 time zones, but when astronomers mention a time, it’s often “Universal Time”     (Coordinated Universal Time or UTC). to find your time zaone use this chart and either add or subtract from GMT or UTC as it is known now. 

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